The importance of technology in teacher education is quite effective for the recruitment and retention of minority students.  But what about technology education as a secondary school discipline?  Can its subjects be time-honored and a linkage to African American participation in higher education?  Is there any aspect of its subject structure that sets it apart from other curriculum areas in verbalization with higher education?  The technology education knowledge does not have the necessary research and experience-based conclusions to satisfactorily answer the foregoing questions.  However, we can gain insight into possible connections by examining the linkages that have been created by other disciplines and the recruitment and retention of minority students.

The College Board has sponsored a project, called Equity 2000, to improve the college participation rate of students in six mainly  minority school districts. The program will require students of those districts to take algebra and geometry.  The project is based on research indicating that low-income and minority students who master algebra and geometry attend and graduate from college at approximately the same rate as higher income white student’s Medical education is another field of study worthy of examination by technology educators.  Perhaps similar skill-building summer programs could be cooperatively structured across secondary technology education programs and technology teacher education programs.

Colleges need to look across disciplines to find examples of successful minority recruitment and retention programs.  The declining number of minority teachers is a serious threat to the social ideals of public schools in a racially and culturally diverse democracy.  . Minority teachers can play a critical role as empathetic mentors for minority students and as non-stereotypical examples for majority students (A singular solitary approach for minority recruitment will not adequately serve the diverse needs of blacks, and long lasting friendships through networks, community-based organizations, local schools, and community colleges.  Such relationships are needed so that students become more involved in grooming minority students for college at an earlier age.

 Technology teacher education departments should work in tandem with other campus offices and departments to increase the pool of minority students as opposed to competing with one another for the existing supply of minority students. For example, departments can collaborate to serve adult minority         students through community-based organizations, military programs, community colleges, public and private trade schools, apprenticeships, and organized labor. Constituents of these groups need to be aware of employment opportunities in technology education teaching Technology teacher educators should work actively with community-based organizations.

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